10 Women Changing the World

As we celebrate today International Women’s Day, we over at the Unikorn.org Headquarters wanted to shine the light on a few of the many (too many to count or list) women who are breaking paradigms, stereotypes and inspiring all over the world. As a women run company ourselves, we look at these women in awe at their stories. Take a look at our ‘10 Women Changing the World’ compilation below and celebrate their social, economic, cultural and political achievements.

This list, celebrating International Women’s Day is a glimpse into the upcoming Unikorn 100 Most Impactful Women List which will be released later in this year. If you wish to nominate someone for it, we want to hear it! To nominate, go here.

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Whitney Wolfe Herd

FOUNDER AND CEO, BUMBLE – ‘THE RULE-BREAKER’

Whitney Wolfe Herd is an American entrepreneur. She is the founder and CEO of Bumble, a social and dating app, launched in 2014 and was an early executive at Tinder. Wolfe Herd also cofounded the well-known dating app Tinder – she left the company and sued over sexual harassment. In 2021, Herd became the world’s youngest female self-made billionaire after taking Bumble public.

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Martha Debayle

BUSINESSWOMAN, ENTREPRENEUR AND TV PERSONALITY – ‘THE ENTERTAINER’

One of the most recognized entrepreneurs and communicators in Mexico, with more than 30 years of experience in television, radio, internet, magazines and personal branding. Chosen as one of the 107 inspiring personalities portrayed in the book Those Who Inspire Mexico, published in May 2018 by publisher Those Who Inspire Ltd. As well as constantly being featured in Forbes Most Powerful Women List and a recipient of the Latin Grammys 2019 Leading Lady in Entertainment. Martha has made being an entrepreneur fashionable and relatable to the Mexican and overall Latin American market by bringing in a fun and eccentric personality.  

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Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala 

DIRECTOR-GENERAL, WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION – ‘THE DIPLOMAT’

.Nigerian economist Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala was appointed Monday as the director general of the World Trade Organization, becoming the first woman and the first African national to lead the global trade body. The appointment of Okonjo-Iweala clears a major administrative hurdle for the WTO, which has been without an official leader since former director general Roberto Azevêdo stepped down from the position a year early in August. After growing up in Nigeria during the Biafran civil war, Okonjo-Iweala studied development economics at Harvard and earned a doctorate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has made history throughout her career, becoming the first woman to serve as both the Nigerian finance minister in 2003 and foreign affairs minister in 2006. Okonjo-Iweala was also the first woman to run for the presidency at the World Bank, where she spent more than two decades.

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Kiara Nirghin

SCIENTIST AND STANFORD STUDENT – ‘tTHE INVENTOR’

Kiara is a 20 year old scientist, innovator and speaker. At 16, Kiara won the grand prize at the Google Science Fair and the Community Impact Award with her solution to the worldwide drought. She has developed a unique superabsorbent polymer that holds hundreds of times its weight in water when stored in soil. It is biodegradable, inexpensive and free of harmful chemicals, unlike the manmade materials currently used. The polymer, made entirely from waste products, improves the environment, increases the chance for plants to sustain growth by 84% during a drought and can increase food security by 73% in disaster-struck areas. Part of Google Impact Fund Board and recognized by TIME and Forbes as one of the 30 Most Influential People.

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Luma Fawaz 

CEO, OASIS500 – ‘THE JOB-CREATOR’

Fawaz was appointed CEO of Amman-based pre-seed and seed fund manager and accelerator Oasis500 in 2018, after serving as Head of Investments since 2015. The company has invested $9.9 million in 169 startups that have raised over $60 million, creating more than 800 direct jobs and 4,000 indirect jobs.Some startups in its portfolio include MadfooatCom, Audiogram and Crowd Analyzer. In 2020, Oasis500 invested $1.4 million in 14 startups. According to the company, Fawaz has increased female contributions as founding team members in the organization to 36%. Waiving rent payments from all its startups to provide support during the pandemic.

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Melanie Perkins

CO-FOUNDER, CANVA – ‘THE DREAM-TEAM’

Perkins, an alum of the 2016 Forbes 30 Under 30 Asia, co-founded Canva with Cameron Adams and Cliff Obrecht (now her fiancé) in 2013 while an undergrad at the University of Western Australia. The graphic design software company has raised more than $300 million since, with the latest round ($60 million) in June valuing it at $6 billion. Canva started out as a free-to-use website offering design tools enabling amateur designers to turn out professional-looking graphics, from party invites and posters to corporate brochures. It has since expanded to offer paid, premium packages for professionals and enterprises, helping it turn profitable in mid-2017 and putting it in competition with the likes of Adobe. Now available in more than 100 languages, Canva has more than 700 employees and over 30 million active monthly users in 190 countries.

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Jacinda Ardern

PRIME MINISTER OF NEW ZEALAND – ‘THE POLITICIAN’

She’s a New Zealand politician who has become the youngest-ever leader of New Zealand’s Labour Party, she became the country’s youngest Prime Minister in 150 years, and its youngest female PM, ever. Her rise was so meteoric that it earned a proper name: Jacinda Mania Ardern set new norms as a government leader when she gave birth, took six weeks maternity leave and shared that her partner will be a stay-at-home dad. Rising to power on a tide of “Jacindamania,” at 38, she is the youngest female leader in the world and New Zealand’s youngest PM in 150 years. She was elected to a second term in a landslide in October 2020. As leader of the Labour Party, she promises an “empathetic” government, with ambitious plans to tackle climate change and child poverty.In 2020, she received global praise for her capable handling of the Covid-19 pandemic. New Zealand successfully eliminated the virus in both waves.

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Naomi Osaka

PROFESSIONAL TENIS PLAYER – ‘THE ATHLETE’

Naomi Osaka is the world’s highest-paid female athlete, unseating Serena Williams, who held the title the previous four years. After back-to-back Grand Slam wins at the 2018 U.S. Open and 2019 Australian Open, she signed a bevy of blockbuster endorsement deals. She earned more than $30 million off the court, thanks to deals with Nike, Nissan, MasterCard and a dozen other partners. Born in Japan to a Japanese mother and Haitian-American father, Osaka was expected to be one of the faces of the since-postponed 2020 Tokyo Games. She was the first Japanese player to win a Grand Slam event, and the first Asian player to hold the top ranking in singles.

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Jenny Holzer

AMERICAN ARTIST AND ACTIVIST – ‘THE ARTIST’

Jenny has been an active artist for over 4 decades, dedicating her space and art to speak and address political, social and economic discords as protest.  In 1989 she became the first female artist chosen to represent the United States at Italy’s Venice Biennale and was awarded the Golden Lion in 1990. She also holds the Crystal Award from the World Economic Forum and received the Distinguished Women in the Arts Award from the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (MOCA). She continues to constantly take up arms through her artwork.

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Greta Thunberg

ENVIRONMENTAL ACTIVIST – ‘THE ACTIVIST’

Greta is an 18-year-old who grew up in Stockholm, Sweden. In 2015, Greta was diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome, which is now considered an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). People with the Asperger syndrome tend to focus deeply on one idea or interest, and the cause of Thunberg has become climate change. In May 2018, aged 15, Greta won a climate change essay competition in a local newspaper. Three months later, in August, she started protesting in front of the Swedish parliament building, vowing to continue until the Swedish government met the carbon emissions target agreed by world leaders in Paris, in 2015. She held a sign that read “School Strike for Climate” and began regularly missing lessons to go on strike on Fridays, urging students around the world to join her. Her protests went viral on social media and as support for her cause grew, other strikes started around the world, spreading with the hashtag #FridaysForFuture.

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Unikorn Staff
All posts from Unikorn Staff is a reposting from other stories found - the link to the original story with author will always be found at the bottom of the article. You can submit a self-written story you want to share with the Unikorn Community with its link in the Contact Us form.

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