Croatia Opens Its Doors To Digital Nomads

From the streets of King’s Landing, aka Dubrovnik, to the lakes and waterfalls of Plitvice, to the 1000+ stunning islands, Croatia is a beautiful land to take your time and explore. And what better way to take that time than spending an entire year there. 

That’s what’s possible for digital nomads as the country joins a growing list of places where remote workers can call their temporary home. 

From Zagreb to Dubrovnik

Currently, visitors to Croatia can stay up to 90 days, which is pretty typical for most of Europe. To access the new, longer, digital nomad temporary stay visas, you of course first have to be a digital nomad. Here’s how Croatia defines that:

A DIGITAL NOMAD IS a third-country national who is employed or performs work through communication technology for a company or his own company that is not registered in the Republic of Croatia and does not perform work or provide services to employers in the Republic of Croatia.” 

Emphasis theirs. Pretty typical, and not as restrictive as some similar visa types in other countries. 

The visa is granted for up to a year and can’t be extended. Six months after it expires, you can apply again. Close family members can join the visa holder.

There are, of course, a few more specifics. You’ll need a passport that’s good for 3 months beyond your required stay and proof of health insurance that’s good for Croatia.

Caves and waterfalls
View of waterfalls in Plitvice Lakes National Park. GETTY

You’ll also need “proof of purpose” which they define as “contract of employment or other document proving that the person performs work through communication technology for a foreign employer or his own company which is not registered in the Republic of Croatia.” That includes a statement from a “foreign” employer, a contract, or a registration of ownership in a company. Fairly standard stuff to prove you’re really a digital nomad, and shouldn’t be too difficult to obtain. 

You’ll also need to prove means, or “proof of subsistence.” You’ll need to have “at least 2.5 average monthly net salaries paid for the previous year” which can’t be less than 16,142.50 HRK, which is about $2,600 USD. “More precisely, if you intend to stay in the Republic of Croatia for 12 months, you need to prove that you have a minimum of HRK 193,710.00 [~$31,000] available.” 

You’ll also need proof you’re not a convicted criminal, and an address where you’re staying in Croatia. 

How to apply

Dubrovnik. Croatia.
Sea Walls – part of Dubrovnik military defences – defend the city from sea-based attacks. GETTY

In addition to multiple forms, there are some fees. For ease of reading, I’ll convert them to US dollars. 

  • A $67 fee for the the granting of a temporary stay.
  • $74 for the visa.
  • $50 for a biometric residence card.

The fees are slightly different if you apply at a police station versus a diplomatic mission or consulate. In all, not bad compared to some countries fees for the same type of visa. 

Parts of Croatia, especially Dubrovnik, can be very expensive. Other parts, no less beautiful, are far less. With a whole year to explore, I bet you’ll be able to find the best spots.

You can find the original article here